Course Descriptions

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  • LAW 824
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC, approval by clinical faculty. The Community Advocacy Law Clinic is a one-semester, 3 credit experiential course where students use their legal training to assist our community’s most vulnerable populations: low-income families, children, the elderly, the homeless, and people suffering from physical and mental illness. Students, under the supervision of clinical faculty, will work with judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, social workers and others to address the legal needs of real clients in a wide variety of matters including adoption, child support, housing, public benefits and special education. Law students will attend a weekly seminar and a weekly supervisor meeting. Law students will be given the opportunity to assist clients from beginning to end - intake, through research and strategy, informal advocacy or going to court. The two goals of the Community Advocacy Law Clinic are to improve the legal skills of law students and to address the unmet legal issues of the poor. Satisfies skills and experiential skills course requirements.

  • LAW 567
    (2 or 3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This course examines and compares constitutional law and structure of governance of different countries of the world. Questions explored include: Why have constitutions? How do the structures of constitutional courts and the practice of judicial review differ in different countries? How do different constitutions deal with separation of powers, legislative process, regime changes, federalism, individual rights and social welfare? The course aims at helping students think systematically about different structures for organizing a government, and different approaches to establishing just, effective and stable forms of governments. Satisfies perspective requirement.

  • LAW 581
    (2 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This course examines the legal system of the Latin Catholic Church. In addition to an historical overview of the science of canon law, lectures address specific canons of the 1983 Code of Canon Law and selected canonical issues. Subjects to be considered include: structures of governance, general norms of canon law, ecclesiastical rights, ecclesiastical sanctions (criminal law), trial procedures, marriage law, and temporal goods (i.e., property law, contracts, wills, and monetary issues). Satisfies perspective requirement.

  • LAW 665
    (2 or 3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC* The course will cover the growing area of computer crimes. Students will learn about the different types of criminal offenses, which include but are not limited to economic, gambling, child exploitation, and fraud offenses. Further, the student will study the different investigative techniques utilized by the government in curbing such offenses as well as methods of defense explored on behalf of the accused. The student will also be exposed to the various Constitutional provisions contemplated during the processing of a computer crime and/or investigation.

  • LAW 632
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. The law relating to actions having elements in more than one jurisdiction; choice of law; enforcement of foreign judgments; jurisdiction of courts in such cases; constitutional questions involved application to contracts, torts, marriage and divorce, family relations, property, and procedure. Offered infrequently.

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