Course Descriptions

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  • LAW 621
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This course focuses for the most part on police investigation techniques, such as searches, interrogations, undercover activities, electronic eavesdropping, and lineups. Closely studied will be constitutional limitations on these practices, flowing from the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th Amendments. Other topics covered may include the right to counsel, the entrapment defense, bail, and/or plea bargaining.

  • LAW 678
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*; Criminal Procedure I, LAW 621, is recommended but not required. This course focuses on the criminal trial process from the charging decision through trial and sentencing including: case theory and role of counsel; grand jury proceedings; pretrial release and detention; discovery and other pretrial motions; plea bargaining and guilty pleas; jury selection and deliberation, sentencing procedures and guidelines. Particular emphasis is given to the protections provided by the U.S. Constitution in criminal proceedings. State and federal rules of criminal procedure may be studied.

  • LAW 735
    (2 or 3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This seminar considers the interaction between information technology (i.e., computer hardware, software, networks and electronic or digital content), particularly as manifest in the Internet, and the law. We will examine substantive areas of the law which bear directly on information technology (particularly, e.g., intellectual property, contract), as well as ways in which information technology is itself shaping and transforming the law (regarding, e.g., privacy, jurisdiction), economics and culture. Classes will encourage open discussion of readings (from text and select online sources) and students should expect one or more written exercises and class presentations in addition to a substantial project (e.g., research and writing) due at the end of the term. Students are encouraged to have some background training or experience (undergraduate studies, employment, other law school courses, etc.) that reflects basic knowledge of/interest in information technology and/or issues arising from its contemporary applications. Satisfies Upper Level Writing requirement.

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