The New Constitution by S. Medary

print thisprint this

The New Constitution by Samuel Medary is a weekly pamphlet issued from May 5, 1849 to November 17, 1849, dealing with issues surrounding the call for a convention to create a new constitution. 

Table_of_Contents

Number 1  pp. 1-16, 5-5-1849 Number 10 pp.145-160, 7-7-1849 Number 19 pp. 289-304, 9-8-1849
Number 2  pp. 17-32, 5-12-1849 Number 11 pp. 161-17, 7-14-1849 Number 20 pp. 305-320, 9-15-1849
Number 3  pp. 33-48, 5-19-1849 Number 12 pp. 179-192, 7-21-1849 Number 21 pp. 321-336, 9-22-1849
Number 4  pp. 49-64, 5-26-1849 Number 13 pp. 193-208, 7-28-1849 Number 22 pp. 337-352, 9-29-1849
Number 5  pp.65-80, 6-2-1849 Number 14 pp. 209-224, 8-4-1849 Number 23 pp. 353-368, 10-6-1849
Number 6 pp. 81-96, 6-9-1849 Number 15 pp. 225-240, 8-11-49 Number 24 pp. 369-384, 10-13-1849
Number 7 pp. 97-112, 6-16-1849 Number 16 pp. 241-256, 8-18-1849 Number 25 pp. 385-399, 10-20-1849
Number 8  pp. 113-128, 6-23-1849 Number 17 pp. 257-272, 8-25-1849 Number 26 pp. 400-408, 11-17-1849
Number 9  pp. 129-144, 6-30-1849 
 
Number 18 pp. 273-288, 9-1-1849  

About Samuel Medary and The New Constitution: 
Historians recognize Samuel Medary as, "...a leading national politician, territorial governor of Minnesota and Kansas, and copperhead editor.  His impact on date constitution-making, however, has been neglected".  George Phillip Parkinson, Jr.,  Antebellum State Constitution-Making: Retention, Circumvention, Revision, Dissertation, University of Wisconsin, Ph.D., 1972, 154.    

He headed ... the movement for a constitutional convention.  He published pamphlets weekly from May through October 1849 which proved to be of great assistance to the radical revision movement throughout Ohio.  When bound together they composed a book of four hundred pages entitled The New Constitution.   Adding other articles, comments from newspapers, law journals and periodicals, Medary provided a documentary history of state constitution-making for the entire nation.  

The New Constitution   illustrated the cooperative and imitative character of Ohio constitution-making.  The unifying them of the work showed that Ohioans would adopt new constitutional provisions based not only on their own experience, but also upon similar problems arising in other states.  Medary recommended that Ohioans adopt provisions from other new state constitutions that had already proved effective.  Medary's emphasis was a response to Whig fears of untried drastic Democratic ideas.  He showed the Ohio revision movement would not necessarily bring chaos and an end to "law and order".
...
Medary, nevertheless, ably led the movement for a new constitution in Ohio and engineered the circumvention effort that began during the spring of 1848.  

Parkinson, supra at p. 156-157. 

|