CLE Programs

1st Annual Cleveland-Marshall Symposium Day

CLE credit: 
5 hrs (3 panels) pending
Weight: 
-10

 

Cleveland-Marshall's three excellent journals, The Cleveland State Law Review, The Global Business Law Review, and the Journal of Law and Health, are pleased to present CMLAW's 1st Annual Symposium Day, hosting expert panels to address timely legal issues in a five-hour CLE event. Cosponsored by The Gnoêsis Group. 

 

Register

Panel 1: Trustbusting Big Tech

Sponsored by The Cleveland State Law Review

9:00 AM – 1: 00 PM

This panel will discuss the applicability and enforcement of antitrust law in the twenty-first century. In particular, our symposium will focus on the challenges posed by “big tech” platforms like Facebook, Amazon, Google, and Apple and whether federal (the Sherman Act) and state antitrust laws are adequate to support competition in the marketplace.

The topic is important and timely because the practice of antitrust law is evolving as various lawmakers and regulators propose different frameworks for enforcement. The states, the federal government (DOJ/FTC), and the European are stepping up enforcement against big tech platforms and presidential candidates are laying out new frameworks for American antitrust policy. We believe that our symposium will benefit any attorney who advises business entities.

This panel will be educational because attendees will have the opportunity to hear from experts in the antitrust field: prominent antitrust professors in the region. Moreover, they will hear from lawmakers, like two Ohio state senators, who are currently investigating big tech companies and rethinking the state's antitrust legislation. Finally, they will hear from regulators and individuals associated with startups to learn about the potential harm to small business without government action.

Speakers:

Rita Bryce, JD, LISW is an antitrust professor at Case Western Reserve University Law School. Bryce worked for the U.S. Department of Justice in the Antitrust Division, and as a federal prosecutor. She is also a Licensed Independent Social Worker. 

Senator John Eklund is a member of the Ohio State Senate, representing the 18th District. He is a member of the Judiciary Committee (Chairman), Energy and Public Utilities Committee, Finance Committee, General Government and Agency Review Committee, Rules and Reference Committee, and Ways and Means Committee. Eklund is also Senior Counsel at Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP, where much of his work has been centered on areas pertaining to anti-trust litigation, trade regulation, price fixing, class actions, and mergers and acquisitions. He has been named an Ohio Super Lawyer in antitrust litigation and is listed in Best Lawyers in America for Antitrust Law.

Diana Moss is the President of the American Antitrust Institute in Washington, D.C. She is an economist whose work spans both antitrust and regulation, with industry expertise in electricity, petroleum, agriculture, airlines, telecommunications, and healthcare. She is editor of Network Access, Regulation and Antitrust (2005). Dr. Moss is Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Economics at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Senator Larry Obhof is the President of the Ohio Senate for the 133rd General Assembly, representing the 22nd District. President Obhof serves on the Intergovernmental Policy Advisory Committee on Trade (IGPAC), which provides policy advice to the U.S. Trade Representative on issues involving trade and development, including the impact and implementation of trade agreements. He also chairs the Ohio Senate’s Rules and Reference Committee and is Vice Chair of the Joint Legislative Ethics Committee. Prior to his election as President of the Senate, he served as both President Pro Tempore and as Majority Whip.

Daniel Rauch serves as Senior Counsel to the Colorado Attorney General. Rauch was formerly an associate at Wheeler, Trigg & O’Donnell and a Tenth Circuit Clerk for current Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch. Rauch’s article, Sherman’s Missing “Supplement”: Prosecutorial Capacity, Agency Incentives, and the False Dawn of Antitrust Federalism is being published in issue 68.2 of Cleveland State Law Review.

Chris Sagers is the James A. Thomas Distinguished Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Cleveland-Marshall Solo Practice Incubator at Cleveland Marshall College of Law. He is the author of several books, including United States v. Apple: Competition in America (Harvard Univ. Press 2019). He is a member of the American Law Institute, a Senior Fellow of the American Antitrust Institute, and a leadership member of the ABA Antitrust Section.

Charles Stack is the CEO of Flashstarts, a startup accelerator and micro-venture fund in Cleveland. In 1992, Stack started Books.com, the first online bookstore. Charles won the Ohio Venture Association (OVA) Venture of the Year award in 2007. He has mentored and/or been a judge at numerous business plan and startup competitions including multiple Startup Weekends and the many University hackathons.

Alec Stapp is a Fellow at the International Center for Law & Economics in Washington, D.C. Previously, he worked as a technology policy fellow at the Niskanen Center in Washington, D.C. and as an MA fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University in Arlington, VA. He has a master’s degree in economics from George Mason University and a B.S. in economics from the University of Arizona.

**Attendance at this individual panel earns 2.5 CLE Hours

Panel 2: Rideshare Technology: Its Legal Implications & How It Affects the Way We Travel

Sponsored by the Global Business Law Review

 1:15 PM – 3:50 PM

Rideshare platforms, such as Uber, Lyft, and Waymo provide a feasible, low-cost alternative to traditional rideshare methods of technology. However, laws and regulations have not caught up with this new technology. For example, the drivers do not neatly fit in a category with taxi drivers. Unlike taxi drivers, most drivers employed by these new rideshare companies are not full-time employees; and they use their own vehicles not only to pick up customers, but also for personal driving. This panel will discuss a variety of legal issues affecting these new rideshare companies from the perspective of public and private employment, insurance, and tort litigation.

Speakers:

Sheryl King Benford is General Counsel and Deputy Manager for Legal Affairs at the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA). She supervises and oversees litigation, labor issues, risk management, and safety at the GCRTA.

Mathew Parker is a partner at Fisher Phillips and works in their autonomous vehicles practice group. Mathew has been counsel in more than 20 class and collective actions involving some of the most common wage-and-hour “traps” like misclassification of exempt employees or independent contractors; failure to properly calculate the regular rate of pay; tips, service charges, and tip pools.

Dana Paris is a trial attorney at Nurenberg, Paris, Heller and McCarthy and specializes in representing victims who have suffered injuries as a result of automotive collisions; trucking collisions; motorcycle collisions; medical negligence; and birth trauma.

John P. O’Neil specializes in tort litigation involving personal injuries and has tried more than 80 jury trial in various areas of the law, including transportation and premises liability.

Dedrick Stephens, CFE is the Commissioner of Assessments and Licenses for the City of Cleveland. Dedrick oversees multiple operations in the administration of 75+ different local, state, and federal laws in the fields of excise tax administration, business regulation assessments and weights & measures regulations. He is also active in regulatory governance of emerging technologies and industries. He has participated in a National Institute of Standards and Technology subcommittee analyzing proposed legislation to regulate the measurement of distance from global positioning systems that are utilized by Uber and Lyft. 

**Attendance at this individual panel earns 1.25 CLE Hours

Panel 3: The Future of the Legalization of Medical Marijuana and its Potential Consequences

Sponsored by the Journal for Law And Health

 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

This panel will examine the history of the legalization of medical marijuana in Ohio, and the current movement to have it legalized for recreational purposes. The speakers will explore the possible public health consequences of legalization; the ways legalization might impact other areas of law; the ethical issues that arise from representing marijuana clients; and the conflict between state and federal law.

Speakers:

Ian Friedman is a partner at Friedman & Nemecek, L.L.C., which is a Cleveland-based criminal defense law firm. His practice is focused on criminal, cyber, and white-collar matters. He represents individuals and entities across the United States and has served as counsel in Europe, Asia, and South America. Ian is the current President of the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association. He is a past-President of the Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and was the first lawyer to be named its “Lawyer of The Year” in 2010. He is a Fellow of the American Board of Criminal Lawyers and served as President in 2018. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law where he has taught Cybercrime since 2006. In 2019, he was named by his peers as Best Lawyers, Lawyer of the Year, Criminal Defense, General Practice in Cleveland.

Tom Heran - Professional Ethics and Marijuana Law: Tom Haren is an associate at Frantz Ward in Cleveland, Ohio. His practice is focused on marijuana law and policy. His reputation in the Cleveland legal community has made him a go-to attorney for Ohio’s incoming medical marijuana industry. In this role, he works with the medical marijuana cultivator, processor, and dispensary applications and license holders. He assists clients in license application and acquisition, zoning and municipal law, product labeling and packaging, and regulatory compliance. Mr. Haren is a former nominee for the State Senate and often shares his experience and expertise by speaking at industry conferences and events.

David Patton -The History and Future of Marijuana Law: David Patton began his legal career in the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, working in administrative enforcement. He served on the Major Appeals Group handling cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, the Ohio Supreme Court, and other state and federal appellate courts. Since joining the private sector in Solon, Ohio, Mr. Patton assists clients in obtaining, protecting, and maintaining licenses. Mr. Patton’s interest in medical marijuana law in Ohio stems from personal experience: his son was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2013 and greatly benefits from the use of cannabidiol. After seeing positive results in his son, Mr. Patton has put his legal expertise to work in the emerging medical marijuana industry by using his experience in administrative and regulatory law.

**Attendance at this individual panel earns 1.25 CLE Hours

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Friday, December 6, 2019 - 9:00am to 6:00pm
Short title: 
1st Annual Cleveland-Marshall Symposium Day

*POSTPONED: Blockchain Law and Business Basics Workshop

CLE credit: 
4 hours pending
Weight: 
-10

***THIS EVENT IS POSTPONED And WILL BE RESCHEDULED FOR A LATER DATE, TBA

Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and the IOT Collaborative in partnership with the University College London’s world-leading Centre for Blockchain Technologies UCL CBT) invite you to attend the Blockchain Law and Business Basics Workshop.

As digital assets and currencies begin to gain wider mainstream and institutional adoption ($200+bn market cap, $20-30+bn daily transactional volumes and $1.5bn in VC investments [2019]), there is a growing demand for high-quality education on how blockchain or distributed ledger technology is changing the way business is executed; why blockchain is different; how it works and the legal issues it raises.

 This workshop is grounded in the growing number of significant industrial and governmental research engagements conducted by UCL CBT. The workshop is a thorough program that provides an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of the underlying technology and design principles behind DLT’s, its different governance structures and effects on business models, regulations, legal issues culminating with exploration of practical applications in financial services, manufacturing/IoT, law and healthcare.

Who should attend?

Anyone interested in learning about blockchain legal issues and business applications. The workshop is accessible to all fields and all levels of experience.

What will I learn? 

• What is a blockchain or "Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT)"?
• DLT Design
• DLT Governance and Consensus models
• Legal and Regulatory Implication of DLTs
• Use cases and applications of DLT
- Cryptocurrencies
- Financial Services
- Legal Services
- Manufacturing/IoT
- Healthcare

Presenter:

Thamim Ahmed, Researcher, UCL Centre for Blockchain Technologies

Thamim focuses on Research and Development activities within financial services sector at the leading Centre for Blockchain Technologies at University College London (UCL CBT). Core activities involve carrying out token economic designs, building DLT solutions for central banks, start-ups and governmental institutions and advising subject matter experts on building technical capabilities of their blockchain applications.

Thamim has a background as a physicist then engineer and product manager, and possesses deep knowledge of the fintech industry, specialising on payment systems and digital assets. Thamim has a proven ability to lead teams in defining strategy and executing software solutions. He is an expert at architecting systems through meaningful user experience that will enrich lives and build business success.

On a more personal level, Thamim has a deep-rooted belief that DLT’s will be the answer to bridging the gap between machine and human interaction, to which a ‘privacy first’ approach will play a crucial role in ensuring trust is sustained and coordinated by large organisations around their customer and business data.

Cosponsored by The Internet of Things Collaborative 

 

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Friday, December 13, 2019 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Short title: 
*POSTPONED: Blockchain Law and Business Basics Workshop

Smart Cities, Surveillance and Privacy (Virtual Event)

CLE credit: 
3.0 credit hours
Weight: 
0

“Smart” or “connected” cities and the related phenomenon of “smart” policing and technical surveillance tools, including facial recognition, present a constellation of complex and evolving technological, social, political and legal issues.

A small, but growing, number of cities, counties and other government agencies have started to develop new laws, policies and citizen engagement processes to address the privacy and civil liberties concerns these new technologies pose. Similarly, law enforcement and other agencies that deploy these technologies at the federal, state and local levels have developed an emerging set of policies and standards regarding the use of these new tools and for analyzing the data they produce.

Both contexts share a common set of core issues that revolve around the critical need to translate a combination of legal, technical and ethical requirements into a working set of policies and procedures that government employees and law enforcement officials at all levels can apply easily “without access to a bevy of expert statisticians, privacy lawyers, or philosophers.”

This conference brings together government officials, privacy and civil liberties advocates, and other experts to examine the privacy and civil liberties concerns raised by the use of facial recognition and other surveillance technologies and to examine existing models and emerging best practices for how communities can work with state and local government to thoughtfully address them.

The conference is generously supported by the Charles Koch Foundation in partnership with the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection and the IoT Collaborative.

3 CLE/IAPP credits;
December 17 2:00-5:00 Civic Data Privacy Leaders Workshop-invitation only.

View Agenda

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SPEAKERS

Sarah Carrier

Sarah is the Privacy Program Manager for the City of Seattle. Helping to define, promote, and enforce best practices and City standards in support of individuals' privacy and public trust, she has spent the last several years driving the City toward responsible data stewardship.

Sarah started out as a privacy and surveillance ordinance compliance specialist at the City, helping City departments navigate Ordinance-defined processes and standards in a consistent and transparent way. She now oversees the surveillance compliance program and is leading her team, focusing on addressing privacy and data ethics issues in emerging technologies and City services.


LYDIA DE LA TORRE

Lydia de la Torre is a member of the Board of the California Privacy Protection Agency, the editor of Golden Data, and an adjunct professor of privacy law at Santa Clara University Law School. Until recently, Lydia was of Counsel at Squire Patton Boggs were she provided strategic privacy, data protection and cybersecurity advice. She is licensed to practice law in Europe (Spain) and the US (California) and has over 15 years of experience working in data protection, privacy, and cybersecurity both in-house and as outside counsel, for organizations that run the gamut, from pre-IPO start-ups to mature Fortune 500 companies, in a multitude of industries, including e-commerce, fintech and computer hardware.

 


Kelsey Finch

Kelsey Finch, CIPP/US, is Senior Counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum and represents FPF from Seattle, WA. Kelsey leads FPF’s projects on smart cities and communities, data de-identification, ethical data-sharing and research, and other select projects, and serves as an expert and thought leader across the country through speaking engagements, media interviews, and interaction with local, state, and federal regulators and strategic partners. Her work has been published in the Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, the Fordham Urban Law Journal, and the Santa Clara Law Review. Before coming to FPF, Kelsey was an inaugural Westin Fellow at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, where she produced practical research on a range of privacy topics and edited the FTC Privacy Casebook. She is a graduate of Smith College and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, with a concentration in Intellectual Property and Information Law.


Farhang Heydari

As Executive Director of the Policing Project, Farhang oversees the Project’s day-to-day operations and strategic initiatives. He also spearheads the Project’s work around policing technologies, such as our engagements with private companies and law enforcement agencies around ethical design and operation of policing tech.

Farhang has long worked on criminal justice reform. In addition to his work at the Policing Project, Farhang is a Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School, having taught courses on civil rights litigation and mass incarceration. He joined the Policing Project from the civil rights law firm Neufeld, Scheck and Brustin, LLP, where he focused on representing individuals who have been victims of official misconduct.

Farhang is a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law School, where he served as the editor-in-chief of the Columbia Law Review. After law school, Farhang clerked for Judge Diana Gribbon Motz of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and Judge Kimba Wood of the Southern District of New York.


Brian Hofer, Chair, City of Oakland Privacy Advisory Commission; Chair and Executive Director, Secure Justice

Brian Hofer is Chair of the Oakland Privacy Advisory Commission and the Chair and Executive Director of Secure Justice. His advocacy has been instrumental in a number of nation-leading ordinances, including ones that established a vetting framework for the potential acquisition and use of surveillance equipment and the first ordinance prohibiting San Francisco’s use of facial recognition technology.


Cait Kennedy

Cait Kennedy is an advocate, researcher, and social impact entrepreneur creating change through on-the-ground organizing, data analysis, social impact innovation, and voter engagement, with a particular focus on under-represented communities. She is a Ph.D. student at the Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University and Executive Director & Co-Founder of unBail, which helps defendants navigate the criminal legal system through a mobile application.


ADAM KING

Adam Drue King is a technologist and creative whose work focuses on digital justice, broadband deployment, and community-led innovation as a means for community and economic development in Northeast Ohio, and beyond.

Adam has experience establishing broadband network solutions in close to fifty locations nationwide. He has consulted on broadband solutions for municipalities, architected networks for campuses, and deployed open and closed networks in commercial spaces since 2013 These networks range from multi-million dollar county-wide broadband deployment for up to 750,000 users in a southern state, to an ultra-fast wireless mesh solution covering a 6-acre corporate campus with over 1,000 on-site staff, to a wireless system over several floors at a large church. As Director of Neighborhood Partnerships & Equity at a Cleveland nonprofit, Adam drove the mission of making Greater Cleveland’s digital future more equitable and helped shepherd in a primary initiative delivering wireless internet to un- and underconnected communities in Cleveland. Relationship building with organizations and individuals is an integral piece of his approach work.

Adam’s ongoing projects and areas of interest include: pursuing the activation of public spaces in nontraditional ways through his Jikoo initiative, continuing to help lower the bar for entry into the digital age, promoting digital justice, and powering-with residents and neighborhoods to ensure access to tools of technology and innovation. He is currently consulting on multiple initiatives, including an international initiative to leverage virtual power plants as a means to support a green economy, and a national movement to community ownership of broadband networks and infrastructures.

Adam brings passion, commitment, and creativity to all of his efforts as he strives toward his vision for a more activated, connected and just world. King holds technical certificates from Microsoft and Google, is a nationally sought out expert and speaker on the topics of technology and digital justice.


VINHCENT LE, LEGAL COUNSEL, TECHNOLOGY EQUITY

As Legal Counsel with the Greenlining Institute’s Economic Equity team, Vinhcent leads Greenlining’s work to close the digital divide, protect consumer privacy, ensure algorithms are fair and that technology builds economic opportunity for communities of color. In this role, Vinhcent helps develop and implement policies to increase broadband affordability and digital inclusion as well as bring transparency and accountability to automated decision systems. Vinhcent also serves on several regulatory boards including the California Privacy Protection Agency.

Vinhcent received his J.D. from the University of California, Irvine School of Law and a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego. Prior to Greenlining, Vinhcent advocated for clients as a law clerk at the Public Defender’s Office, the Office of Medicare Hearing and Appeals and the Small Business Administration.


BRIAN RAY, PROFESSOR OF LAW, DIRECTOR, CYBERSECURITY AND PRIVACY PROTECTION CENTER, IOTC CYBERSECURITY LIAISON, CSU CLEVELAND-MARSHALL College of law

Professor Brian Ray has extensive experience in information governance, cybersecurity and data privacy. He co-founded and directs the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection and edits the Center-sponsored SSRN Cybersecurity, Data Privacy and eDiscovery eJournal. Ray also co-founded the Cleveland eDiscovery, Data Security and Privacy Roundtable, an informal group of lawyers, judges and academics that meets monthly to discuss issues surrounding electronic discovery, cybersecurity and data privacy issues.

Ray's research focuses on security and privacy regulation, national and international jurisdiction over data, and data governance, collection and use policies at the municipal, county and state levels. He is part of a small team of researchers that in 2018 established the Internet of Things Collaborative (IoTC) with a $1.75 million Digital Excellence Grant by the Cleveland Foundation. He serves as the IoTC Cybersecurity Industry Liaison working with faculty on both campuses and industry to develop applied research and education programs related to IoT security.

In 2016 Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine appointed Ray to the CyberOhio Advisory Board. He co-chairs the Northeast Ohio CyberConsortium's Workforce Development Committee and is a member of the Sedona Conference's Data Security and Privacy Liability Working Group. He was selected to participate in the Yale University Cyber Leaders Forum in 2017, and SC Magazine named him one of three Outstanding Cybersecurity Educator in the 2017 Reboot Leadership Awards.

Ray also is an expert in comparative and international law. His book, Engaging with Social Rights: Participation, Procedure and Democracy in South Africa's Second-Wave provides a comprehensive analysis of the South African Constitutional Court's social rights decisions. He was a Fulbright Scholar in South Africa and has published extensively on comparative constitutional law and social rights.

Professional Experience and Education: Litigation associate at Jones Day in Cleveland, Ohio; judicial clerk for Judge Alan E. Norris, U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and Justice Richard J. Goldstone, Constitutional Court of South Africa; J.D., Ohio State University College of Law (Order of the Coif; Articles Editor of The Ohio State Law Journal, and valedictorian); Fulbright Fellow, Kyoto University; B.A., University of Notre Dame.


Mike Shapiro, Chief Privacy Officer, County of Santa Clara

As Chief Privacy Officer for the County of Santa Clara, Mike Shapiro brings a wide range of experience across the information privacy life cycle. In the consulting world, he excelled in leading government and industry professional teams advising clients on the most pressing privacy matters from new program development and data breach preparedness to privacy training and compliance.

With approximately 2 million residents and 22,000 County government employees in the heart of Silicon Valley, Mike is working to create an enterprise privacy program in support of constituent and employee privacy alike. Building upon the County’s exceptional growth in technology and economic development, he also looks forward to creating the public-private partnerships necessary to establish a Privacy Center of Excellence (COE). Working with industry and academia, the COE can discuss the latest privacy threats and solutions, socialize best practices, and strive to balance responsible information sharing with privacy protections. Mike has also participated in panel discussions and initiatives involving elections privacy and security issues, along with the influence and impact that online news sources and social media have on voters and the election process.


Jonathan Witmer-Rich, Associate Dean, CSU Cleveland-marshall College of Law

Professor Jonathan Witmer-Rich is an expert on privacy and surveillance, including the legislative and regulatory frameworks governing surveillance such as Title III, the Stored Communications Act, and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). His research and teaching examines emerging forms of government and private-sector surveillance in the context of both national security and law enforcement, in particular the NSA’s post-9/11 programs. He has written about the proper legal frameworks for new forms of surveillance, including a series of articles on delayed notice search warrants—a form of covert searching authorized in the USA PATRIOT Act. His articles have appeared in the Florida Law ReviewCriminal Law and Philosophy, the Pepperdine Law Review, and the Case Western Reserve Law Review.

Professor Witmer-Rich gained substantial experience with these issues working in the Federal Public Defender's Office, where he litigated questions involving the Classified Information Procedures Act, rendition, and numerous forms of government surveillance. He also reviewed and analyzed classified government intelligence representing several Guantanamo Bay detainees in habeas corpus proceedings in the D.C. District Court. Prior to that he worked extensively with what is now known as the “Enron Corpus”—the large database of documents disclosed by Enron following bankruptcy— while representing the Royal Bank of Scotland in the Enron securities class action and related litigation at Jones Day.


 

 

Agenda:

1:30pm - 2:30pm: Civic Data Privacy Leaders Network

The Future of Privacy Forum, in partnership with the MetroLab Network launched the Civic Data Privacy Leaders Network, a collaborative with representatives from over 30 municipalities that provides an active, authoritative resource for municipal leaders to navigate emerging privacy issues, share practical guidance, and promote fair and transparent data practices. This session will introduce the Network, discuss its work and future plans.

  • Brian Hofer, Chair and Executive Director, Secure Justice and Chair, City of Oakland (CA) Privacy Commission
  • Kelsey Finch, Senior Counsel, Future of Privacy Forum
  • Brian Ray, Professor of Law, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law (moderator)
  • Mike Shapiro, Chief Privacy Officer, Santa Clara County (CA)

Background Materials:

2:30pm - 2:45pm: Networking Break

Attendees assigned to random breakout rooms for informal networking and discussion.

2:45pm - 3:45pm: Assessing and Auditing Smart Technologies

Smart technologies offer a host of potential benefits from real-time maintenance and more efficient public services to transparent governance and open data. They also pose serious risks to individual privacy and raise fears of surveillance. This panel will discuss the ways that privacy risk assessments and audits can identify and mitigate those risks and help develop best practices for the responsible development and use of these technologies.

  • Lydia de la Torre, Founder, Golden Data Law
  • Sarah Carrier, Privacy Program Manager, City of Seattle (WA)
  • Farhang Heydari, Executive Director, Policing Project
  • Kelsey Finch, Senior Counsel, Future of Privacy Forum
  • Jonathan Witmer-Rich, Professor of Law, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law (moderator)

Background Materials:

3:45pm - 4:00pm: Networking Break

Attendees assigned to random breakout rooms for informal networking and discussion.

4:00pm - 5:00pm: “Smart” Technology, Community Advocacy & Engagement

Too often new technologies are adopted and implemented by individual public agencies with little or no input from the communities most affected by them. This panel will discuss the importance of engaging communities directly affected by “smart” technologies, the challenges in ensuring effective and inclusive engagement processes and the ways that community advocates can raise awareness of their potential risks and benefits.

  • Kelle DeBoth, Assistant Professor School of Health Sciences, Cleveland State University
  • Hector Dominguez-Aguirre, Open Data Coordinator, City of Portland (OR)
  • Caitlin Kennedy, Founder, unBail (moderator)
  • Adam King, Technologist & Creative, Principal at SYLOW Collective
  • Vinchent Le, Senior Counsel, The Greenlining Institute

Background Materials:

 

 

Register

Location: 
Zoom
Event date: 
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm
Short title: 
Smart Cities, Surveillance and Privacy (Virtual Event)

Online Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection Conference

CLE credit: 
8 Hrs pending
Weight: 
0

RESCHEDULED and now ONLINE: SEPTEMBER 17-18, 2020

A truly cross-sector event now in its 5th year, Cleveland-Marshall’s Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection Conference is one of the leading educational and networking events in the Great Lakes Region, and features rich content of interest to legal and compliance professionals, information technology and security experts, and executives responsible for developing security and privacy policies.

Registration opens at 11:45 pm each day. Program begins at 12:15 pm each day.

Conference Details

 

Register

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 12:15pm to 5:15pm
Short title: 
Online Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection Conference

51st Annual Moot Court Night and Appellate Advocacy Seminar

CLE credit: 
1.5 free hours pending
Weight: 
-10

A distinguished panel of judges will preside over and comment on a mock appellate argument involving the following issues:

  • whether the domestic relations exception to federal jurisdiction applies in a federal question case
  • whether the actual malice standard applies to false reporting by the media about a limited-purpose public figure.
Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
Moot Court Night

Current Issues in LGBTQ Non-Discrimination Law

CLE credit: 
1.5 free hours pending
Weight: 
-10

The road to equality and inclusion for LGBTQ individuals has been a long one, and recent legal developments at the local, state and federal level suggest that the journey is far from over. Panelists will discuss current issues pertaining to LGBTQ nondiscrimination protections including whether Title VII’s prohibitions on employment discrimination extend to LGBTQ individuals, a matter that will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on October 8th and likely decided by the Court by June 2020; ongoing religious-based challenges to protections afforded to LGBTQ people by state and local nondiscrimination laws, a matter that was addressed but by no means resolved by the Supreme Court’s 2018 decision in Masterpiece Cakeshop; the current status of state and local non-discrimination laws that protect LGBTQ individuals from discrimination, including information on the ongoing efforts to expand these protections in Ohio and elsewhere; and other related issues.

 

Moderator

Raphael Davis-Williams, Ohio ACLU Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Panelists

Susan J. Becker, Ohio ACLU General Counsel

Matthew W. Green Jr., Associate Professor of Law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Alana Jochum, Equality Ohio Executive Director

Co-Sponsors

Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association LGBT & Allies Committee, ACLU Ohio, Equality Ohio, The American Constitution Society Northeast Ohio Chapter


A reception in the law school atrium will follow the program.

Registration Information

The program is free and open to the public but registration is required. 

Register

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
LGBTQ Non-Discrimination Law

400 Years After: The Continuing Impact of Slavery

CLE credit: 
3 Hours Pending
Weight: 
-10

This continuing legal education (CLE) program seeks to educate attorneys about the role that law played in installing, implementing, and ending the enslavement of black Africans. It will also examine the ethics of the attorneys who owned slaves and those who enforced the laws that helped to maintain the institution of slavery. The speakers will examine slavery’s impact on laws in place to prevent medical research on human subjects; the constitutional provisions that may be used to justify reparations; the laws that re-enforced the institution of slavery; and the labor laws that have led to a professional sports regime that mimics slavery. In addition to the presentations, the members of the audience will have the opportunity to listen to parts of the New York Times’ 1619 Project, marking the 400-year anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the colony of Virginia.

Topics and Speakers:

Making the Legal Case for Reparations After 400 Years of Silence

Ayesha Bell Hardaway

Analyzing the Laws That Permitted Slavery After 400 Years of Struggle

 Browne C. Lewis

Examining the Legacy of Slavery Through the Lenses of Sports After 400 Years of Skirmishes

Delante Thomas

Discussing the Unethical Use of Enslaved Black People As Research Subjects After 400 Years of Sorrow

Deleso Alford

Speakers

Ayesha Bell Hardaway is an Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law in the Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic. As a member of the faculty, Hardaway has taught as a clinician in the areas of health law, civil litigation and criminal justice. Her research and scholarship interests include the intersection of race and the law, constitutional law, criminal law, health law and civil litigation. Her upcoming article on reparations will be published by the New York University Review of Law & Social Change later this month. Professor Hardaway received her B.A. from The College of Wooster and her J.D. from Case Western Reserve School of Law. 

Deleso Alford is a professor at Southern University School of Law. Professor Alford earned a B.S., magna cum laude at Southern University A&M College, a J.D. at Southern University Law Center, and an LL.M. at Georgetown University Law Center. She has a Certification in Clinical Bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin. Her forthcoming book, Tuskegee's Forgotten Women: The Untold Side of the U.S. Public Health Services Syphilis Study, sheds light on how women were directly involved in and/or impacted by the U.S. Public Health Services Syphilis Study. This book offers an acknowledgment of the importance of women's voices, and especially black women's voices, in history.

Browne C. Lewis is the Leon M. and Gloria Plevin Professor of Law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University. Professor Lewis received her B.A., summa cum laude from Grambling State University; her M.P.P. in Public Policy from the Humphery Institute; her J.D. from the University of Minnesota School of Law; and her LL.M. in Energy and Environmental Law from the University of Houston School of Law. Her recent article on human oocyte cryopreservation is forthcoming in the Arkansas Law Review, and her latest book on death and dying is scheduled to be published by Edward Elgar Publishing.

Delante Spencer Thomas received his B.S. in Sports Management and Legal Studies and his M.S. in Public Relations from Syracuse University. He received his J.D./Master of Labor Relations & Human Resources from Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University. Currently, Mr. Thomas is Deputy Inspector General for Cuyahoga County where he focuses on ethics.

Moderator 

Lon'Cherie' Billingsley received her B.A. from The Ohio State University and her J.D. from Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Currently, she is a staff attorney with the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland focusing on housing inequities. Prior to that, Ms. Billingsley served Cuyahoga County as an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney for six and a half years. 

Registration Information

Cost is $100 for those requesting Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit; accepting check and credit card only at the door; cost is Free for all other attendees. Registration is required for all attendees.

Register

 

 

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm to 7:30pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
The Continuing Impact of Slavery

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