CLE Programs

LexisNexis Academic Presentation

CLE credit: 
1.5 hours free
Weight: 
0

In reference to the LexisNexis Academic (LNA) database, attendees will be able to:

  • describe LNA law-related content
  • describe how to construct a Boolean or Connector search
  • describe how to construct a segment search
  • explain how to retrieve a case by citation
  • explain how to search for cases, statutory code sections, regulations, and law review articles
  • explain how to Shepardize a case (ie, find materials that cite a case)

Program Format:

Hands-on training, accompanied by lecture and PowerPoint presentation.

Detailed outline and PowerPoint slides to be provided to attendees.

Presenter:

Laura E. Ray, MA, MLS, is the Instructional Services Librarian at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University. She coordinates Law Library instructional programs, advises on collection issues for medical and health care materials, as well as provides classroom research instruction, reference service, and assistance with faculty instructional support. Laura has presented and moderated numerous workshops and lectures at national and regional library conferences since 1982, addressing a myriad of topics on legal research, legislative advocacy, educational design and learning styles, and the audiovisual enhancement of learning.

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Law Library Room A059)
Event date: 
Thursday, August 28, 2014 - 10:00am to 11:30am
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
LexisNexis Academic Presentation

Criminal Justice Forum I: Prof. Stephen Vladeck - Military Justice and Article III

CLE credit: 
1.0 free
Weight: 
0

Stephen I. Vladeck is a Professor of Law and the Associate Dean for Scholarship at American University Washington College of Law. His teaching and research focus on federal jurisdiction, constitutional law, national security law, and international criminal law. A nationally recognized expert on the role of the federal courts in the war on terrorism, he was part of the legal team that successfully challenged the Bush Administration's use of military tribunals at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, 548 U.S. 557 (2006), and has co-authored party and amicus briefs in a host of other major lawsuits, many of which have challenged the U.S. government’s surveillance and detention of terrorism suspects. Vladeck, who is a co-editor of Aspen Publishers’ leading national security and counterterrorism law casebooks, has authored reports on related topics for a wide range of organizations, including the First Amendment Center, the Constitution Project, and the ABA’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security.
 

“Military Justice and Article III”

The Supreme Court has long held that federal adjudication before judges lacking Article III’s salary and tenure protections is permissible today only in the three categories of cases in which the Court has previously allowed it — all cases before federal “territorial” courts; criminal prosecutions before military tribunals; and “public rights” adjudication before non-Article III judicial or administrative bodies. And although the Justices have repeatedly grappled with the outer bounds of this last category in recent years, they have generally accepted the first two as settled. Scholars have followed suit, with virtually all of the extensive literature in the field focusing on the specific scope of the public rights exception, or on the search for cross-cutting theories of Article III. As a result, it has been decades since any concerted effort has been undertaken to rationalize the scope of the military exception — whether to the Constitution’s text or purpose or to more prudential considerations. And although the similarly neglected territorial courts have remained largely untouched over the past quarter-century, the same period has witnessed significant expansions in the scope of both court-martial and military commission jurisdiction to encompass offenses and offenders not previously thought to be amenable to military, rather than civilian, trials. Although these expansions have been especially pronounced with regard to the scope of court-martial jurisdiction, they are also reflected in, for example, the en banc D.C. Circuit’s 2014 decision in the Al Bahlul Guantánamo military commission appeal. Given these expansions, the litigation that they have provoked, and the tensions they have placed upon the military exception, the time has long since passed for a reassessment of where and how military justice fits into our understanding of Article III.

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Short title: 
Criminal Justice Forum I: Prof. Stephen Vladeck

Cleveland State Law Review Symposium - History and the Meaning of the Constitution

CLE credit: 
3 hours approved
Weight: 
0

Cleveland State Law Review Symposium - "History and the Meaning of the Constitution," co-sponsored by the Federalist Society 

Law and history are deeply intertwined. Legal thinkers and judges have employed varying approaches to using history when reading the Constitution. This symposium will explore history's role in this regard, whether it be through historical context, originalism, the spirit of Founding-era documents, or another of the various methods. 
 
Speakers:
  • Patrick Charles, "History as a Guidepost to Interpreting the Constitution"
  • Sheldon Gelman, "Court-packing and the 'Switch in Time': Recent Developments"
  • Scott Gerber, "Liberal Originalism: The Declaration of Independence and Constitutional Interpretation"
  • Lee Strang, "Originalism's Promise and Limits"
 
Patrick Charles, J.D., is the author of numerous articles and books, including a forthcoming book entitled "Historicism, Originalism, and the Constitution: The Use and Abuse of the past in American Jurisprudence." Charles currently serves as a historian for Air Force Special Operations Command 352nd Special Operations Group. 
 
Sheldon Gelman, J.D., LL.M., writes about constitutional law, law and psychiatry, and jurisprudence, and his articles have appeared in the Georgetown Law Journal, the Minnesota Law Review, and Constitutional Commentary, among others. He is a Professor of Law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. 
 
Scott Douglas Gerber, Ph.D., J.D., has published eight books including, most recently, with Oxford University Press. He is a Professor of Law at the Ohio Northern University Pettit College of Law and was recently named one of the top law professors in Ohio.
 
Lee Strang, J.D., LL.M., clerked for Chief Judge Alice M. Batchelder of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and was also an associate for Jenner & Block in Chicago. He is Professor of Law at the University of Toledo College of Law.
Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Friday, April 18, 2014 - 9:00am to 12:15pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
Cleveland State Law Review Symposium

Four Core Differences in US and Australian Law and Application to Schools, Teachers and Students - Joy Cumming

CLE credit: 
1 hour approved
Weight: 
0

Joy Cumming is a Professor of Education in the Faculty of Education and Arts at the Australian Catholic University, leading a research program on Assessment, Evaluation and Student Learning within the Learning Sciences Institute Australia. Originally a secondary school teacher in English and Mathematics, she has been involved in educational research for nearly 40 years.

The origins of Australian and US law from the English system should indicate that the systems are similar. Both have statute and common law, both make assumptions of innocence and pursue adversarial approaches to establishing guilt or liability. In practice, especially for education law, four core differences, three from Constitutional law and one from public law, frame the impact of both education praxis and legal challenges. This presentation will provide an overview of Australian law, and differences from US law, with examples of the impact of the differences on education law challenges: Individual rights; Reserve powers; the Establishment Clause, and the Briginshaw principle for burden of proof.

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Monday, March 31, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
Core Differences in US and Australian Law and Educational Applications

Great Stories Program: The Legacy of Slavery

CLE credit: 
3 hours approved
Weight: 
0

Great Stories program: The Legacy of Slavery

What is the legacy of America's brutal slavery experience and it's terrible "Jim Crow" aftermath?

For information contact Prof. Arthur Landever at a.landever@csuohio.edu or Louise Mooney at 216-334-6700.

There is a $30. registration fee which includes continental breakfast. Please RSVP by March 27, 2014 to Laverne Carter at 216-687-2349. There is limited enrollment.

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (LB 60)
Event date: 
Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 8:50am to 12:35pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
Great Stories Program: The Legacy of Slavery

CMLAA-CLE seminar - Elder Law Care

CLE credit: 
3 hours pending
Weight: 
0

All Saturday morning CLE's are from 9:00 am - 12:15 pm. Registration begins at 8:30am.

March 22 - Elder Care Law

Many myths abound regarding Medicaid and Veterans benefits eligibility. This CLE will detail the complex eligibility criteria for Medicaid for elderly clients, both in and out of nursing homes. The CLE will detail strategies commonly used by elder law attorneys to protect assets legally. The CLE will also detail the Veterans Benefits available to elders facing chronic care, and their intersection with the Medicaid system. Even if you are not an elder law attorney, knowing what pitfalls to avoid in advising an increasingly aging population will give the attorney valuable information.

The program will further delve into the subject of elder care with the issue of elder abuse. The CLE will explain what constitutes elder abuse, neglect (including self-neglect) and financial exploitation, how to recognize the “red flags” of elder abuse, the duty to report, and what measures Adult Protective Services can take under APS law and/or guardianship law, to reduce the risk to vulnerable older adults.

As our families and clients age and begin to face nursing home stays and chronic disease management, knowing the way the long term care system works is critical. When a loved one or client goes into a nursing home, they do not always understand their rights under federal and state law within that system.

Speakers: Rachel A. Kabb-Effron, Esq. and Kelli Kay Perk, Esq.

Register Via Pay Pal  or Download Registration Form Here

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 9:00am to 12:30pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
CMLAA-CLE seminar - Elder Law Care

Rescheduled: 45th Annual Moot Court Night: Appellate Advocacy Seminar

CLE credit: 
1.5 hours approved
Weight: 
0

Appellate Advocacy Seminar - 45th Annual Moot Court Night

Location: 
1801 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (Moot Court Room)
Event date: 
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Event category tags: 
Short title: 
Rescheduled: 45th Annual Moot Court Night: Appellate Advocacy Seminar

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