Course Descriptions

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  • LAW 735
    (2 or 3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This seminar considers the interaction between information technology (i.e., computer hardware, software, networks and electronic or digital content), particularly as manifest in the Internet, and the law. We will examine substantive areas of the law which bear directly on information technology (particularly, e.g., intellectual property, contract), as well as ways in which information technology is itself shaping and transforming the law (regarding, e.g., privacy, jurisdiction), economics and culture. Classes will encourage open discussion of readings (from text and select online sources) and students should expect one or more written exercises and class presentations in addition to a substantial project (e.g., research and writing) due at the end of the term. Students are encouraged to have some background training or experience (undergraduate studies, employment, other law school courses, etc.) that reflects basic knowledge of/interest in information technology and/or issues arising from its contemporary applications. Satisfies Upper Level Writing requirement.

  • LAW 676
    (2 Credit Hours)

    Prerequsities: RCC. Disability Law examines laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability with particular emphasis on Titles I, II, and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, The Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988 and Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Substantive areas that will be covered include efforts to combat discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, housing, and education, as well as efforts to curb disability-based discrimination in the provision of health care services, in accessing places of public accommodation and by public entities. Students will explore the ways in which the law has attempted to protect individuals against disability discrimination as well as examine continued challenges individuals with disabilities encounter despite existing legal protections. The course will be an elective course in the Health Law Certificate program and in the Employment & Labor Law Concentration.

  • LAW 640
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC. This course is a survey of federal and state cases, statutes, and regulations affecting the care, personal well-being, and estates of America's elderly population. Particular attention is paid to federal and state rules covering eligibility for Medicaid assistance to the elderly and the interpretation of Medicaid estate recovery regulations. Standard contracts for assisted living, elderly day care, in-home nursing care, nursing home care, and pre-paid funeral and burial trusts will be reviewed.

  • LAW 727
    (3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. This course explores regulation of the political process and voting rights, at both the federal and state levels. We consider constitutional and statutory law constraining who is qualified to vote; election administrative procedures (including specified voting technologies and days for voting, voter IDs and registration requirements); reapportionment and redistricting of legislative districts under the Equal Protection Clause (one person, one vote and political gerrymandering in particular); political parties' legal roles in the electoral system; campaign finance regulation; and the Voting Rights Act. We will devote significant attention to Ohio's election law and election administrative difficulties that resulted in a successful constitutional challenge to Ohio's election system. We will also consider remedies for "defective" elections with Bush v. Gore a prime focus. Course requirements include an experiential learning component of a wide range of possibilities. Satisfies the Administrative Law Requirement.

  • LAW 685
    (2 or 3 Credit Hours)

    Prerequisites: RCC*. Pension and benefit funds are currently the largest single source of capital in the nation (over $3 trillion). Their collection, administration, distribution, and other key aspects are regulated in private sector employers by the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). ERISA provides complex tax and other incentives to businesses to create and administer pension and benefit funds. The course focuses primarily on ERISA and its impact on a host of employment and business-related problems, including collective bargaining, tax planning, multi-employer bargaining arrangements, mergers, acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, plant closings, layoff, bankruptcies, divorce and probate, preemption of state law, fiduciary relations, and fiscal policy.

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